How do lions, leopards, cheetah and other larger carnivores survive?

What contributes the diet of the larger carnivore species in the Okavango region? The study of large carnivore species requires information about what they eat; what are potential prey species in the range area, and which species are most abundant. In order to answer such questions, we conduct game count surveys twice a year. The survey is performed during wet and dry seasons to determine population trends of animal (herbivore) species which occur in the southern part of the Okavango region.  

The Game Count

The count is done for ten consecutive days in the morning only along a 36km road that has been selected for the count. A driver and two observers are required for the survey. A vehicle is driven at a speed of 15-20km/h; observers scan for animals on either side of the road and count all mammal species, of body size from as small as bat-eared fox, to as large as an elephant. We began the dry-season survey yesterday (8th October). Besides the struggle to get up from enjoyable sleep early in the morning, it is fantastic and enjoyable to see lots and lots of amazing activity during the first hour of the day.  

Enjoy  pictures of Day1?

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Survey crew

impala herd 

Impala is the most abundant antelope  in the area. 

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Elephants. Its unusual to see an elephant laying on the ground

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Female giraffe with young

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Male kudu crossing

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A pair of steenbok watching in us with us with curiosity as we approach.

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This this lonely male warthog posed nicely for the camera

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  1. By ?????? on April 4, 2010 at 12:06 pm

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